Green perspectives on Stockwood and Bristol. Mostly.

Tuesday, 2 August 2011

Caring for Chatterton's Birthplace


Above, a picture taken on 14th July of Thomas Chatterton's birthplace on Redcliffe Way. Looking well cared for, and with a nice bit of local food production outside.

Below, the same place this last Sunday. The veg have been thriving, but everything else has gone downhill. The place is derelict.


Anyone know the story?

8 comments:

Tim Denning said...

I put a few feelers out and got this back from Elisabeth Winkler

"Then responsibly and creatively squatted by Eng Lit students who cared for the house and helped restore it.

They were evicted - now the 18th century house is derelict again."

I don't know the reason for the eviction though.

realfoodlover said...

Hi Pete

I heard about Chatterton's house (or was it where he went to school?) from Gus Hoyt, Ashley's first Green Party councillor.

I posted the link to your blog enquiry on his Facebook profile:

Gus says: "Funnily enough, I have arranged 3 meetings with all groups involved for restoration interest tomorrow pm (Tuesday 9 Aug). Will update you then!"

H.M. Castor said...

Have you had any further news on this? I saw the house last Saturday (October 15th) in a very sorry state. I would like to write a piece about it for a history-based joint blog of which I'm a member (http://the-history-girls.blogspot.com/) and would very much appreciate it if you felt able to give me any further information, either about what happened before the students cared for the house, and/or what - if anything - you learnt after that meeting on August 9th. Thank you so much.

Stockwood Pete said...

Sorry, I've heard no more, only noticed that the Redcliffe runner beans look in better shape than mine! But of course, people still have access to look after the beans.

Possibly Gus Hoyt has more news, or possibly the Civic Society might be taking an interest? Or someone else reading this blog?

H.M. Castor said...

Many thanks for your response. I will try to investigate further, following your suggestions. Might I use the photos you have put up on this page in my blog?

Stockwood Pete said...

Of course, you're welcome to use the photos.

This piece from the Evening Post may give some ideas of who to ask about what's happening. Though the Post, with it's trademark slipshod reporting, doesn't get round to saying who actually owns the building. Is it the council? Was it hived off to the Bristol Buildings Preservation Trust, whose trustees seem to be mostly councillors? Or what?

H.M. Castor said...

That's kind of you, thank you. Thanks, too, for the link to that article. Yes, ownership of the building is crucial, isn't it. I'll see if I can find out any more.

Anonymous said...

Actually I happen to know that the squatters moved in less than a week before the initial works were about to commence and that all had to be cancelled. Either a strange coincidence or the squatters didn't really have the building's best interests at heart. Nor did they improve the building - they left lots of rubbish including some carrier bags of human waste! And was it also a coincidence that alll the lead was stolen from the roof about the same time? I've zoomed in on the photos and the only difference I can see is the security grilles - and these were necessitated in order to prevent the vandals from re-entering.